Evaluation Rubrics

Here are some evaluation techniques and rubrics that we have found helpful for evaluating online portfolios:


Traditional teaching strategies focus on verbal/linguistic and mathematical/logical intelligences alone. This creates frustration for those individuals who are comfortable with less traditional learning modalities, such as kinesthetic, visual, interpersonal, intrapersonal, musical, or naturalist. Project based learning lets the teacher incorporate numerous teaching and learning strategies into project based instruction and assessment.

Studies show the value of a multi-phased, multi-tool approach to teaching and assessment. This program is designed to expose teachers to performance based teaching and performance based evaluation methods. Performance-based teaching enables students to use their knowledge and apply skills in realistic situations.

Effective performance based tasks should have the following features:

  • Students should be active participants,
  • Intended outcomes should be clearly identified and should guide the design of a performance task.
  • Students should be expected to demonstrate mastery of those intended outcomes when responding to all facets of the task.
  • Students must demonstrate their ability to apply their knowledge and skills to reality-based situations and scenarios.
  • A clear, logical set of performance-based activities that students are expected to follow should be evident.
  • A clearly presented set of criteria should be available to help judge the degree of proficiency in a student response.
Performance assessment is the direct, systematic observation of an actual pupil performance and rating of that performance according to pre-established criteria. It is monitoring students' progress in relationship to identified learner outcomes. This method requires the students to create answers or products which demonstrate their knowledge or skills. This differs from traditional testing methods which require a student to select a single correct answer or to fill in the blank. The use of multiple teaching and measurement tools permit an exploration of multiple dimensions of particular constructs and, provide a much richer picture of outcomes than any single method or tool would have alone.

Because these techniques are aimed at both individual students, adults and small groups, they can very easily be used without interrupting the flow of the class or workshop. These exercises are particularly useful in providing the instructor with feedback concerning students understanding and retention of material. A few examples are :

Jigsaw Group Projects - In jigsaw projects, each member of a group is asked to complete some discrete part of an assignment; when every member has completed his assigned task, the pieces can be joined together to form a finished project. For example, students divide into groups anywhere from 2 to 6. Each group is given an different article. Each student in the group is given a section to read and become expert on. At a designate time the students are asked to discuss their article and become experts on it. Then each group summarizes and teaches/reports what their article was about.

Panel Discussions - Panel discussions are especially useful when students are asked to give presentations or reports as a way of including the entire group in the presentation. Student groups are assigned a topic to research and asked to prepare presentations (note that this may readily be combined with the jigsaw method outlined above). Each panelist is then expected to make a very short presentation, before the floor is opened to questions from "the audience".

Debates - Actually a variation of the Panel Discussion, formal debates provide an structure for presentations when the subject matter easily divides into opposing views or ‘Pro’/‘Con’. Students are assigned to teams, given a position to defend, and then asked to present arguments in support of their position on the presentation day. The opposing team should be given an opportunity to rebut the argument(s) and, time permitting, the original presenters asked to respond to the rebuttal. This format is particularly useful in developing argumentation skills (in addition to teaching content).

Student Summary of Another Student's Answer - In order to promote active listening, after one student has volunteered an answer to your question, ask another student to summarize the first student's response. Many students hear little of what their classmates have to say, waiting instead for the instructor to either correct or repeat the answer. Having students summarize or repeat each other’s' contributions to the course both fosters active participation by all students and promotes the idea that learning is a shared enterprise. Given the possibility of being asked to repeat a classmates' comments, most students will listen more attentively to each other


Tasks used in performance-based assessment include essays, oral presentations, open-ended problems, hands-on problems, real-world simulations and other authentic tasks. Such tasks are concerned with problem solving and understanding. These tools ensure that assessment is an integral part of the learning-teaching process and that performance is assessed systematically according to planned criteria compatible with the teaching goals and made known to pupils beforehand. In broad terms, there are three types of performance-based assessment: performances, portfolios, and projects.

Rubrics -A rubric is a scoring tool outlining required criteria for a piece of work, or what is important to assess. It also indicates the weighting that has been determined for each criterion, based on its relative importance to the overall task, and describes what the performance would look like at different quality levels. If the pupils receive this before beginning the task, they can more easily internalize the criteria, understand how they will be assessed .
Rubrics can improve and monitor pupils’ performance, by clarifying teacher expectations. They increase validity, reliability and fairness in scoring. And are more objective and consistent Rubrics make teachers and pupils accountable and aware of the learning objectives. They are also easy to understand and use. Lastly they can be referred to in parent-teacher meetings and pupil-teacher conferences where performance is discussed.

A checklist or assessment list is a simpler version of a rubric, specifying the criteria. It only gives the highest level of performance, not all the performance levels.


Portfolios of students work: A portfolio is a purposeful collection of student work that shows the student's efforts, progress, and achievements. The portfolio should include the following:
  • Student participation in selecting contents.
  • Criteria for selection.
  • Criteria for judging merits.
Portfolios represent a collection of students' best work, student-selected samples of work experiences related to the outcomes being assessed, and documents according growth and development toward mastering identified outcomes (Paulson, F.L. Paulson, P.R. and Meyer, CA. (1991, February). "What Makes a Portfolio a Portfolio?" Educational Leadership, pp. 60-63.)



Criteria

Exemplary  8 points

Proficient 6 points

Partially Proficient  2 points

Unsatisfactory       0 points

Points

Content

Structure

The content has a   main idea, purpose and theme and includes useful educational information

The content is written clearly and concisely.

The purpose, theme, or main idea of the website is evident with appropriate educational information.

.

The theme or main idea of the website is vague and does not create a strong sense of purpose or include educational information  

.

The website lacks a clear purpose or central theme and is not useful to students  

.


Content Relevance

The content  points readers to high quality, up to date pertinent resources

The content is highly informative and provides essential information to the reader. Information is updated frequently and includes the date of the update to emphasize freshness of content.

The website showcases students' research projects, data collection assignments, Q&A forums, or other assignments

The content points readers to quality information resources. The content is informative and provides useful information

 

The content points readers to information that does not relate to the purpose or theme of the page. Information is incomplete or inaccurate.

 

The content points readers to some information resources which are inaccurate or misleading or inappropriate for the intended audience.

 

 

Content Feedback

 

The website includes feedback loops such as surveys, forms, or questionnaires.

Annotations include motivating questions and advanced organizers that provide the reader with sense of what will be found on each Web page.

The website includes one feedback loop such as a survey, form or questionnaire.

There are clear annotations describing Web-based resources so that readers can navigate through the sites easily and locate the needed information

The website does not include feedback loops such as surveys, forms, or questionnaires.

A few of the annotations are missing or do not describe the resources clearly so that readers can navigate through sites easily and locate the needed information

The website does not include feedback loops such as surveys, forms, or questionnaires.

Several annotations are missing or do not describe what students will find at the site or do not include advanced organizer questions to assist students in navigating easily through sites to locate the needed information

 

Use of Photos, Graphics, Sound, Animation and Video

All of the photographs, graphics, sound and/or video enhance the content and create interest.

All photos, graphics, audio and/or video files are high quality images or sound with proper voice projection, appropriate language, and clear delivery.

 

Creativity and original images enhance the content of the Web pages in an innovative way

Most of the photographs, graphics, sound and/or video enhance the content and create interest.

Most of the photos, graphics, audio and/or video files are high quality images or sound and effectively enhance the content and create interest.

Most of the files show use of creativity and original images to enhance the content of the Web pages.

A few of the photographs, graphics, sound and/or video are inappropriate for the content and do not create interest.

Some of the photos and graphics are not high quality images. A few of the audio and/or video files are edited with inconsistent clarity or sound  and ineffectively enhance reflective statements, do not create interest,

Some use of creativity or original images is evident that enhances the content of the Web pages.

The photographs, graphics, sounds, and/or videos are inappropriate for the content or are distracting decorations that create a busy feeling and detract from the content.

Many of the photos and graphics are not high quality images or are not properly edited for Web display. Audio and/or video files are not edited or exhibit inconsistent clarity or sound The audio and/or video files are inappropriate examples for the content.

No use of original images is evident to enhance content of the Web pages in an innovative way


Internal and External Navigation

All of the menus, navigation links and all internal links and sections of the website connect back to the home page and/or sitemap.

All external links to connecting websites are active and functioning.

A sitemap/index is provided to make the site easy-to-access.

Most of the menus, navigation links and internal links to sections of the website connect back to the home page and/or sitemap.

Most of the external links to connecting websites are active and functioning.

A limited sitemap/index is provided.

Some of the menus, navigation links and internal links to sections of the website connect back to the home page and/or sitemap, but in other places the links do not connect to preceding pages or to the original index page.

Some of the external links to connecting websites are not active and functioning.

No sitemap/index is provided.

There are significant problems with menus, navigation links and internal links to sections of the website and few or no connections back to the preceding pages or to the original index page.

Many external links to connecting websites are not active and functioning.

No sitemap/index is provided.


Layout and Text Elements

The typography is easy-to-read and point size varies appropriately for headings and text.

Use of bullets, italics, bold, and indentations enhances readability.

Consistent format extends page-to-page. The layout uses horizontal and vertical white space appropriately.

The background, colors and layout are artful and consistent across the website and enhance the readability of the information presented.

 

Sometimes the typography is easy-to-read, but in a few places the use of fonts, point size, bullets, italics, bold, and indentations for headings and subheadings detract and do not enhance readability.

A few minor format inconsistencies decrease readers' accessibility to the content. The layout uses horizontal and vertical white space appropriately in most places.

The background, colors and layout are consistent across the website and make it easy to read the information presented.

 

 

The typography is difficult to read and uses too many different fonts, overuse of bold, bullets, italics or lack of appropriate indentations of text.

Some formatting tools are under- or over-utilized and decrease the readers' accessibility to the content. There are several format inconsistencies throughout the website. The layout uses horizontal and vertical white space inappropriately in some places.

The background, colors and layout are distracting and make it difficult to read the information presented

The text is extremely difficult to read due to inappropriate use of fonts, point size, bullets, italics, bold, and indentations for headings and sub-headings and body text.

Many formatting tools are under- or over-utilized and decrease the readers' accessibility to the content. There are numerous format inconsistencies throughout the website. The layout uses horizontal and vertical white space inappropriately and the content appears cluttered.

The background, colors and layout make the site unattractive, and it is difficult to read the information presented.


Speed Web Pages Load

The Web page graphics download quickly for the target audience.

The Web page downloads reasonably fast for the target audience.

The Web page graphics and content do not download quickly for the target audience. Images are large and require a long time to download.

The Web page graphics and content take a long time to download for the target audience


Writing Mechanics

The text has no errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.

The text has a few errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling requiring minor editing and revision.

The text has errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling requiring editing and revision.
(4 or more errors)

The text has many errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling requiring major editing and revision.
(more than 6 errors)


 





Multimedia Rubric  (Video and Poster)

What am I responsible for?

Each student will be responsible for completing the following items:

    1. Individual questions from your role.
    2.  A group evaluation for each member of your team, your self-included. 
    3.   Presenting a portion of your multimedia presentation.

 What is my group responsible for?

Each group must complete the following:

    1.   A multimedia presentation that is at least 3 to 4 minutes long and follows the criteria listed on the rubric.
    2.  Present their project in a way that will persuade their audience to vote in your favor  .
    3.  A poster identifying the group’s project 


   Rubric - Multimedia Project/Presentation


CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Presentation

Well-rehearsed with smooth delivery that holds audience attention.

Rehearsed with fairly smooth delivery that holds audience attention most of the time.

Delivery not smooth, but able to maintain interest of the audience most of the time.

Delivery not smooth and audience attention often lost.

Mechanics

No misspellings or grammatical errors.

Three or fewer misspellings and/or mechanical errors.

Four misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

More than 4 errors in spelling or grammar.

Content

Covers topic in-depth with details and examples. Subject knowledge is excellent.

Includes essential knowledge about the topic. Subject knowledge appears to be good.

Includes essential information about the topic but there are 1-2 factual errors.

Content is minimal OR there are several factual errors.

Organization

Content is well organized.  Presents information in logical, interesting sequence which audience can follow

Content is  organized.  Presents information in logical,  sequence which audience can follow but the overall organization of topics appears flawed.

Content is logically organized for the most part.  Presenter is uncomfortable with information and is able to answer only rudimentary questions

There was no clear or logical organizational structure, just lots of facts.  Presenter does not have grasp of information.

Originality

Presenter shows a large amount of original thought. Ideas are creative and inventive.

Presenter shows some original thought. Work shows new ideas and insights.

Uses other people's ideas (giving them credit), but there is little evidence of original thinking.

Uses other people's ideas, but does not give them credit.

Visual Aids

Student's visual aids explain and reinforce the presentation

Student's visual aids relate to the presentation

Student occasionally uses visual aids that rarely support the presentation

Student uses superfluous visual aids or no visual aids.

Group Work

Works very well with others.  Assumes a clear role in decision making and responsibilities

Works well with others.  Takes part in most decisions and shares in the responsibilities

Works with others, but has difficulty sharing decisions and responsibilities.

Cannot work with others in most situations.  Cannot share decisions or responsibilities.

Quality of Argument

Students made an excellent argument , backed up with facts, very persuasive 

Students had an argument, but not many facts to back it up

Students did not have a convincing argument for their stand on the issue

No argument made, students presented facts only



     Group Work

        1.  Each group member will be evaluated by the other members of the group.
        2.  Each student will complete a self evaluation of how they worked in their group.
        3.  Each group leader  will complete  an evaluation for each member of the group 

  


A Poster  Should Be...

 

readable,

Readability is a measure of how easily the ideas flow from one item to the next. Text that has lots of grammatical problems, complex or passive sentence structure, and misspellings is "hard to read".

legible,

A common error in poster presentations is use of fonts that are too small to be read from 6-10 feet away, a typical distance for reading a poster.

well organized,

Spatial organization makes the difference between reaching 95% rather than just 5% of your audience: succinct.

Studies show that you have only 11 seconds to grab and retain your audience's attention so make the punch line prominent and brief. Most of your audience is going to absorb only the punch line.

decide what the main message is,

Keep it short and sweet and make this your title.  Use the active voice and avoid the verb "to be" whenever possible.

measure the space you have,

Lay out the space physically as well as on paper.

Eliminate all extraneous material,

Given that the average person spends less than 10 minutes looking at a poster,  you  then have 11 seconds to trap your subject before they move on.  Only show data that adds to your central message. You do need a Title, Authors, Introduction, Results, and Conclusions.

Layout

People approach new information in a known spatial sequence. The title and your name will be seen in the first 11 seconds that a person looks at the poster because they will be centered at the top. This will be all many people will read, The overall format of a good poster is dictated by the way we assimilate information

Font choice:

Sizes,

A good rule is to stand back from your own poster: if you, who are familiar with the material, cannot easily read it from 6 feet away, your audience will certainly not be able to.

Highlighting with text format,

Indents set text apart and are great for short lists. Justification of text in the center of a line will draw attention. Use bold-face, color, or special characters to draw attention.

Ways to add color,

Choose a color that does not compete with your data ..Good contrast will reduce eye strain and make the poster more legible and interesting visually., Be careful that the color does not outclass the visual impact of your data: too much contrast is hard on the eyes and can distract the reader from your data.

Adding light color backgrounds to your figures can make the poster attractive. For example, using white lettering and lines on a blue background can make your poster eye-catching.

Final Check

Have some people look over your poster before you put it all together. If they are confused, it is far better to fix it now.  Pay particular attention to things that may not be necessary: eliminate everything that you can.

 

Poster Grading Rubric

 

 

Communicates Team Activities

Content -

Accuracy

Visually Appealing

Readable

Language and Mechanics

Contains Required Information

Formatted Correctly

Excellent

Clearly conveys an excellent understanding of the project and activities of the team that can be understood by a wide audience

At least 7 accurate

facts are displayed

on the poster

The poster has excellent visual appeal, shows creativity

The poster is

easily readable

from 4 ft away.

Excellent use

of visuals to

enhance the

information

Language used

is appropriate.

Capitalization and

punctuation are

correct throughout

the poster..

Poster contains all

required

information:

Name of team,

Name of Project

 

Good

Conveys an excellent understanding of the project and activities of the team that can be understood by most audiences

5-6 accurate facts

are displayed on the

poster.

The poster has good visual appeal, shows  some creativity

The poster is

readable from

4 ft away.

Good use of

visuals to

convey

information

Language used

is appropriate.

and mostly

free from

errors.

Poster is missing

one of the required

items

 

Adequate

Adequately conveys  a basic understanding of the project and activities of the team that can be understood by a limited audience

3-4 accurate facts

are displayed on the

poster.

The poster has adequate  visual appeal, with limited creativity

Some portions

of the poster

are not

readable from

4 ft away.

Some use of

visuals to

convey

information

Language used

is mostly

appropriate.

and contains

two or more

errors.

Poster is missing

two of the required

items.

 

Marginal

Poster marginally  conveys  a basic understanding of the project and activities of the team

Less than 3 accurate

facts are displayed

on the poster

The poster is not visually appealing not creative

Poster is

difficult to read

from 4 ft away.

Little use of

visuals to

convey

information.

Language used

is not

appropriate.

and contains

several errors.

Poster is missing

more than two of

the required items.

 

 

Not Completed

Not Completed

 

Not Completed

Not Completed

Not Completed

Not Completed

Not Completed



 



Video Rubric

Poor(1)

Fair (2)

Good(3)

Excellent(4)

  
Story Concept/Style

The video is a disconnected series of scenes with no unifying story or information.

The video tells a story but the style and mood do not suit the content

The video tells a connected story, but either the style or mood does not suit the content

The video tells a compelling story in a style and mood which are well suited to the content.

Images

The video features "talking heads" with little or no action to add interest, OR the video uses action excessively.

The video includes some "talking heads" with some background and video effects.

Backgrounds and video effects add interest.  Most of the scenes make the story clearer or give it more impact.

Motion scenes are planned and purposeful, adding impact to the story line.  "Talking heads" scenes are used only when crucial to telling the story.

Content

Sketchy coverage of topic

Topic material presented with basic points covered.

Topic material presented with good insights.

Topic material thoroughly and creatively explored with interesting, supporting information, interviews or unique point of view.

Motion Picture
Elements

Shaky camera shots, poorly recorded audio or carelessly edited.

Edited material contains no shaky footage, audio is clear, and is edited without jumps or "glitches".

Good shot compositions, lighting, sound and accurate editing techniques.

Shows excellent understanding of elements of medium including shot composition, sound recording, lighting and editing.

 





 

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